Tag Archives: Bible

Confirmation Resources

While planning confirmation programs may be at the bottom of your “to do” list, I’ve been compiling resources for a project and one of them was to update my confirmation curriculum chart. Here are two resources you may find helpful when it comes time to discern what resources you may wish to tap into for the upcoming program year as well as a list of links to some great resources to use with whatever you choose to do online or in person.

Continue reading Confirmation Resources

Missing, But Still in Action

Well, it’s been some time since I’ve posted a reflection, sermon, review, or commentary here. Let’s just say I’ve been working on many projects, enjoying life, and piling up a stack of books and slips of paper with notes on which I wish to write about.

So here’s the latest, of which I promise more details in the weeks to come – hopefully on a more regular basis:

Working with some great authors on upcoming books to come out from Church Publishing, including these that have already been published. My “Spring 2017” list is very eclectic: formation, liturgy, social justice. Many are perfect for formation settings (individually for your own enrichment, or for discussion in small groups): Continue reading Missing, But Still in Action

R-rated: How to read the Bible with children

The Christian Century

The Christian Century is the only magazine that I continue to subscribe to via snail mail. Another words – it’s a paper magazine I get delivered by the mailman every other week. I don’t always read ALL of the articles, but I enjoy reading the “faith” news, snippets, lectionary reflections, editorials and several of the regular contributors. I also follow CC on Facebook, which alerts me to articles that will be coming soon.

Today I got such a sneak-preview of an article that I think many of you involved in ministry with children – as a parent or teacher – will be interested in.

The simple fact is that the Bible is not a book fit for children, neither in its unsavory parts—murders, rapes, genocides, betrayals, mauling by wild animals, curses, divine retribution and apocalyptic horrors—nor in many of its neutral or even uplifting parts, including statutes and ordinances, proverbs, genealogies, geographies, prophecies, censuses and pretty much all of the epistles. It’s no surprise that most of these sections get dropped from children’s versions altogether, though at some point we may begin to wonder with what justification they still call themselves Bibles. Scripture is definitely something to ease the little ones into, not drop them in cold. So what’s the best way to go about it?

I’ve written and shared numerous articles and other people’s blog on how to choose a bible to use with children. And how to be truthful in sharing biblical stories – not candy coating them. I don’t agree with everything stated in it, but it will get you thinking, for sure. Read this great article here – and think about subscribing to The Christian Century!

R-rated: How to read the Bible with children | The Christian Century.

New Ten Commandments

Rembrandt, 1659

Ten Commandments for the 21st Century

  1. Treat others as you would have them treat you.
  2. Take responsibility for your actions.
  3. Do not kill.
  4. Be honest.
  5. Do not steal.
  6. Protect and nurture children.
  7. Protect the environment.
  8. Look after the vulnerable.
  9. Never be violent.
  10. Protect your family.

Based on a poll by Channel 4 in the United Kingdom and shared by Peter K. Stevenson & Stephen I. Wright in Preaching the Atonement (Westminster John Knox).

What commandments would you think God would give us today?

Looking for a Bible?

What’s a good study Bible?

What’s Bible should we give our 3rd graders?

What Bible translation is most accurate?

When should we use a paraphrase?

These are just a few questions that are always popping up when it comes to using a Bible. There are a multitude of translations out there and there will soon be a brand, spanking new translation called the Common English Bible that has been in the works for several years with some reputable biblical scholars. And you can get a free copy of the New Testament before it comes out. Sweet!

I’m not the expert on choosing a Bible. But I do know the difference between them all and what I personally prefer to use in my own study and reading (NRSV with comparison using The Message and the NIV). Check out my overview of some of today’s more popular translations. And Gretchen Wolff Pritchard offers a great article on Choosing a Children’s Bible.

For adult study, I prefer these NRSV editions (with equal opportunity links):

What’s your preference? For yourself? For teens? For children?